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UKC Agility Rules Revisions, Summary of Changes

The following changes were inserted directly in the text of the existing rules.

December 11, 2017

Source: UKC Show Operations Department
Email: performance@ukcdogs.com

Happy Holidays Agility Exhibitors and Judges!

While the Agility Advisory Council is plugging away at the major proposed revisions to the UKC Agility program, we wanted to share with you some additional rule changes for 2018. These changes are very easily implemented and were based off of some of the most common suggestions received from agility exhibitors over the last few years.

The changes will be found directly in the current 2011 rulebook in the chapter and section/subsection they apply to. There will be no additional insert for these changes. They will be inserted directly in the text of the existing rules. The old wording will have a line drawn though it and any new wording will be denoted in bold and italic text.

A summary of these rule changes are:

1. Regarding the removal of the Chute (closed) tunnel a hurdle obstacle may be substituted for the Chute in any course design that utilized the Chute as an obstacle. Judges may choose not to replace the chute with a hurdle, but may not substitute any other obstacle. Judges who choose the option of not replacing the chute with a hurdle can design AGI using 12 obstacles.

2. The sit and/or down for the Pause box and Pause table has been removed. The dog does not have to remain stationary on the obstacle and time begins when all four feet are on the table or inside the box. Specific performance requirements and listed faults have been updated in the appropriate sections. All other hander requirements for the performance of these obstacles remain the same.

3. Clubs and judges now have the option of utilizing 6, nine, or twelve weave poles in course design. Clubs are encouraged to publish this information in the premium list or any official announcement or advertisement for the event.

Please see the UKC Official Agility Rulebook to read the specific wording for these rule changes. Please email us with questions. We would be happy to address any questions you may have regarding these updates. We wish you all a happy and healthy Holiday Season!

-UKC Agility Advisory Council

We would also like to announce an added member to the UKC Agility Advisory Council.

Agility Council, New Member

Linda Lavolette
"I started out in 2000 with my Border Collie mix, Roxy. She got her UGRACH, then I had to retire her at about age 7 because she couldn't make it over 20-inch jumps any more, and there was no Veteran division at that time.

"My next dog was Sparky, a mix. He went 2 or 3 legs past his UGRACH4. We dabbled a little in AKC agility and got Novice titles, but I did not like the unforgivingness of the rules and the awful course design. We started in NADAC when he was 10 years old, where he went through the Open division in most of the classes. He is currently 16, and still competes in NADAC in the Intro division in classes that do not require climbing.

"My border collie Carnie went through UAGII in UKC before she let me know me she wasnt happy. We compete in NADAC in classes that dont require jumps or weaves.

"Twister is my current competition dog. He is a border collie. We are working on legs toward his first UGRACH. We also compete in NADAC, and are currently working our way through the Open level. We do every class, and have some clear favorites.

"In 2013, I decided to become a UKC agility judge. It was something that I had been talking about for quite a few years, but didnt have the confidence to try prior to that. Prior to deciding to become a judge, I almost dropped out of UKC agility. A lot of my friends were quitting UKC, for the same few reasons. I decided that I could either be part of the problem or try to become part of the solution, and chose the latter. I've had a lot of judging assignments in the Great Lakes area. I've got a lot of ideas as to things that should be added and things that should go away to try to bring the interest back in UKC agility."

A Kalamazoo, Michigan-based company founded in 1898, United Kennel Club is the largest all-breed performance-dog registry in the world, registering dogs from all 50 states and 25 foreign countries. Celebrating the unique Total Dog philosophy, UKC events highlight the instincts and heritage of dogs that look and perform equally well, as more than 60 percent of its annually licensed events are tests of hunting ability, training, and instinct. United Kennel Club prides itself on its family-oriented, friendly, educational events, welcoming both purebred dogs and dogs of unknown ancestry.

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