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Halloween Safety Tips for your Dog!

That treat bag or candy bowl will more than likely contain chocolate so be sure to keep this out of reach of your pet. Chocolate is toxic to dogs, especially dark chocolate. Don’t let your little ghost or goblin share their treats with their favorite pet.

Some candies contain the artificial sweetener Xylitol which is poisonous to dogs. Xylitol is commonly found in sugar free gum among other sugar free candies, and packs of it can end up in the trick or treat bag, so make sure your dog doesn’t get into it.

While pumpkins and decorative fall corn aren’t poisonous to dogs, they can upset their stomach, so if your dog has access to your fun seasonal decorations, make sure to keep an eye on them so they’re not eating them!

A Halloween pumpkin isn’t the same without a flickering candle, so whether you place your pumpkin indoors or out, this is a fire hazard so be sure wagging tails and neighborhood pets can’t knock these over, possibly igniting dry fall leaves or corn stalks.
Dogs can be cute in costumes, but always keep in mind your pet’s well-being when taking them in that local parade or just doing it for the pictures. Make sure your dog is comfortable and doesn’t become anxious. Some costumes can cover their heads or go around their necks which can be scary for some dogs. If your dog doesn’t like it, don’t make him do it.

Make sure your pet’s costume (and any other for that matter) doesn’t feature pieces that are easily ingested and can possibly cause intestinal blockage.

Re-think taking your dog along trick or treating. It’s usually at dusk and the groups of kids, flickering flashlights, and standard busy nature of the event can be overwhelming for even the most calm and easy going of pets. In a worst case scenario, overwhelming a dog can result in easily preventable bites.

Many knocks and doorbell rings by excited trick or treaters means opening your door many times. To avoid your pet darting out the open door, keep them confined to a safe room or their crate. Even if well-trained, they can still be unpredictable and you don’t want to be chasing your dog down the street. Too many strangers or stressful situations can be too much for your pet anyway, so keeping them away from the center of it is really the best thing you can do for them.